Terrorist issue could be better addressed by Indiarror strike by P

A terror strike by Pakistan-based terrorist group Jaish-e-Mohammed killed at least 40 India paramilitary police and injured many others in the India

n-administered state of Jammu and Kashmir on Thursday, Indian media reported. Blind anger toward China was ignited after it.

Some Indian analysts sought to link the deadly attack to “China’s continued protection” of the perpe

trators. By refusing to back India’s appeal to list Masood Azhar, leader of terrorist outfit Ja

ish-e-Mohammed, as a global terrorist by the UN, they argued, China is supporting terrorism against India.

Citing China’s refusal to support the bid to have Azhar blacklisted by the UN, India in recent years has aggressively bl

amed China for allying with Pakistan in shielding terrorists. It disregards the fact that as a victim of terrorism itself, China has

pledged to support the international community’s anti-terrorism efforts and stands ready to work with India and all other countries to fight terrorism.

As for the issue of listing Azhar, Beijing has reiterated its stand several times that New Delhi should pr

ovide solid facts and proofs for banning Azhar. China has reason to cautiously handle the issue. Observers worry that blacklisting Azhar co

uld be used by India to increase its military pressure on Pakistan, thus risking exacerbating tensions between the two countries.

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